blog

Flowers

Jeff Northam - Thursday, March 03, 2016

Planted some annual flower seeds under lights.

 

Rows 1 - 3

Alyssum Pastel Carpet

 

Rows 4 - 6

Alyssum Mulberry Mix

 

Rows  7 - 8

Lobelia Crystal Palace (Ferry Moss)

 

Rows 9 - 10

Lobelia Crystal Palace (Terrotorial Seed Co)

Lettuce seeds and clean up

Jeff Northam - Monday, February 29, 2016

It's February 29th! With the day off I decided to do a bit of gardening.

 

Cleaned up the raised beds and tilled the soil. Once the soil compacts a big I will plan on adding compost to the top.

 

Planted lettuce seeds indoors.

 

Rows 1 - 3

Arugula

 

Rows 4 - 6

Super Gourmet Salad Blend (LT389 Territorial Seed Company - 2013)

 

Rows 7 - 10

Lettuce Little Gem - Baker Creek Herloom Seeds (2014)

Gardening seeds round 2

Jeff Northam - Friday, February 26, 2016

Had a few moments this morning so I planted another batch of seeds. Also finally took the time to get a timer for the growing lights! Hopefully no more issues of leaving them on/off for 24 hours at a time. Also some of the seedlings from first batch have sprouted. Expect pictures soon.

 

Below in information from the seed packs

 

Rows 1 +2

Brandywine Tomato (sero biodynamic seed). (OP) 85 days. This cherished heirloom has the flavor to which all other tomatoes are compared. An indeterminate, potato-leaf variety with a sweet, rich, slightly spicy flavor. The somewhat squat, lobed fruit are large, up to 7” inches across. Not a heavy-yielding tomato. Brandywine is best staked or caged. A Long season tomato, but this is one of the earliest strains we’ve trialed at London Springs.

Sowing indoors: Start seeds in sterile seedling mix, 6-8 weeks before your average last frost date. Water lightly after planted and cover with a grow dome or plastic to ensure that seeds do not dry out. When the first set of true leaves have emerged, transplant them into a larger pot, burying the stem to a point just below the first set of leaves. At this point make sure not to overwater, so the stem will have time to adapt in the soil and develop roots.

Growing tips – Cover the young plants with a floating row cover or a protect them with cloches to help promote early growth. The use of Red Plastic Mulch can also increase yields.

Fertilization tips – as transplants, fertilize with a high nitrogen fertilizer every 10-14 days. Apply ¼ cup of organic fertilizer into the soil around each plant.

Seed life – 3 years

 

Rows 3+4

Indigo Rose Tomato (sero buidynamic seed) (OP 80 days). The premier high anthocyanin tomato, these 2 inch fruit are loaded with health-giving antioxidants and a complex tomato flavor profile. Indeterminate plants are highly productive, yielding heavy clusters of fruit that ripens to a deep, purple/black where they’re exposed to the sun and burgundy/red on the shaded areas.

Sowing indoors: Start seeds in sterile seedling mix, 6-8 weeks before your average last frost date. Water lightly after planted and cover with a grow dome or plastic to ensure that seeds do not dry out. When the first set of true leaves have emerged, transplant them into a larger pot, burying the stem to a point just below the first set of leaves. At this point make sure not to overwater, so the stem will have time to adapt in the soil and develop roots.

Growing tips – Cover the young plants with a floating row cover or a protect them with cloches to help promote early growth. The use of Red Plastic Mulch can also increase yields.

Fertilization tips – as transplants, fertilize with a high nitrogen fertilizer every 10-14 days. Apply ¼ cup of organic fertilizer into the soil around each plant.

Seed life – 3 years

 

Rows 5&6

Sage (perennial Salvia Officinalis) Territorial seed Company (older seeds)

Germinate – at temps between 60-75

Large seeds need to be covered with soil at least as thick as the seed. May be slow and erratic to germinate.

Needs a period of cold stratification for successful germination. Best results are obtained when the seeds are kept warm and moist for 2 weeks followed by exposure to tems between 33-35 for at least 30-90 days

Sowing indoors – start seeds 6-8 weeks before your last frost. Transplat out after dange of frost has passed

 

Rows 7 & 8

Oregano – Greek – Territorial seed company

Germinate – at temps between 60-75

Large seeds need to be covered with soil at least as thick as the seed. May be slow and erratic to germinate.

Needs a period of cold stratification for successful germination. Best results are obtained when the seeds are kept warm and moist for 2 weeks followed by exposure to tems between 33-35 for at least 30-90 days

Sowing indoors – start seeds 6-8 weeks before your last frost. Transplat out after dange of frost has passed

 

Rows 9 & 10

Rosemary (perry Morse Seeds)

Sowing – startin indoors by seeds thicly in a light, well drained soil 8 weeks before transplanting outdoors. Needs some shade. Transplant outdoors when 6 inches tall. Grows into large perennial shrubs in warm climates but killed by frost everywhere. Cut sprgs as needed.

Suggestions – to store, dry leaves in shade or freeze them when they are cut. Rosemary is a good companion to members of the cabbage family, protecting them from pests.

 

Rows 11 & 12 Sweet Basil (ocimum basilicum) seeds from 2011

Sow in avarege soil in full sun after dager of frost. Sow seeds about 6” apparat and cover with ¼” of fine soil. Firm lightly and keep evenly moist. Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days. Thin to stand about 12” apart when seedlings are 1-2” tall. Harvest when buds begin to form up until frost


Indoor planting

Jeff Northam - Friday, February 19, 2016

Had a few moments this morning and I thought I would start sowing some indoor seeds. A few weeks I created a small indoor space complete with 4 rows of fluorescent lights (I should probably get some grow light blows but they are expensive) to start my garden seeds. I'm always excited to start the process of plant growing in the early spring. It's a rewarding experience to grow plants that will be used for food and/or visual pleasure (flowers to come!) Also means that summer is on it's way!

 

The information below is taken from the seed packs. Also many of these seeds are getting to be on the old side. I have a habit of buying seeds, sowing some, and then storing them in a box. I noticed some of the scallion type onions I planted were dated 11/11!

 

For potting mix I used miracle grow potting mix. For watering and fertilizing I used Clonex seed/cloning solution of 2 capfuls per gallon of water. This solution was poured into the bottom of the container to help keep the soil moist. Before covering the soil was lightly sprayed with warm water. 

 

 

Date started Feb 19

Block A

 

Rows 1&2

PP677 Hot Pepper Blend Territorial Seed Co

Indoor Sowing – start seeds 8 weeks before your average last frost date. Germination may be slow and erratic. Provide the seedlings with plenty of light to produce strong high yielding plants (not recommended to sow outdoors)

Growing tips – The number of early flowers can be increased by giving the plants a cold treatment before transplanting outside. This is done by exposing the transplants to temps of 55 during the night and 70 in the day. Cold Treatment should occur only after there are 3 sets of true leaves. Transplant out when soil temps has warmed to 60-65

Fertilization tips – high phosphorous soil amendments such as bonemeal will help get the plants off to a fast start. Apply ½ cup o of our blended organic fertilizer around each plant to provide the nutrition necessary for optimum production

Seed specs – min germ standard 70% usual seed life 2 years (these are 3)

Seed depth ¼”

Soil temp for germ 70-90

Days to germination 8-25

Light requirements – full sun

Thin plants to 12-18”

 

Rows 3 & 4

Early Jalapeno Pepper (Ed Hume Seed) – not sure of age

Sowing – So seeds indoors in March or April. Sow 2-3 seeds in individual peat pots or other containers barely covering seeds with 1/8” starter mix. Place pots in plastic seed flat with no drainage holes. Carefully pour warm water into flat, the moisture will soak up from the bottom. Keep in warm room and provide lots of light.

Thinning: When seedlings are about 2 inches high, carefully cut weather plants leaving strongest single plant per pot.

Transplanting and spacing: Harden off you plants and plant outdoors after weather has warmed, markedly and all danger of frost and cold weather has passed. Plant 18-24” apart.

Germination 2-3 weeks at 65-70. Keep soil moderately moist

Ed’s Special advice – Plant peppers in sunny, well drained spot in the garden. Cover with hotcaps when young if cool nights are expected. Feed lightly with vegetable food every 4 weeks. Carefully cut off short piece of stem with fruit to avoid damaging plant.

 

Rows 5&6

PP670 Golden Star Hybrid Sweet Pepper Territorial seed company (2014)

Sowing indoors – start seeds 8 weeks before your average last frost date. Provide the seedlings with plenty of light to produce strong high yielding plants (not recommended to sow outdoors)

Growing tips – The number of early flowers can be increased by giving the plants a cold treatment before transplanting outside. This is done by exposing the transplants to temps of 55 during the night and 70 in the day. Cold Treatment should occur only after there are 3 sets of true leaves. Transplant out when soil temps has warmed to 60-65

a fast start. Apply ½ cup o of our blended organic fertilizer around each plant to provide the nutrition necessary for optimum production

Seed specs – min germ standard 70% usual seed life 2 years (these are 3)

Seed depth ¼”

Soil temp for germ 70-90

Days to germination 8-25

Light requirements – full sun

Thin plants to 12-18”

 

Row 7&8

ON554 Walla Walla sweet Spanish Onion Territorial seed company (2014)

Sowing indoors – Start up to 100 seeds in a 4-6” pot. Place in a warm location and keep moist. If you cannot transplant outside before the tops reach 5”, then cut back the tops to 3”

Sowing outdoors – Direct-sown crops will be more uniform. Sow when soil temps are at least 55

Growing tips – Thin bulbing onions 5-7 inches between plants and bunching onions 2” between plants

Fertilization tips – Before transplant or seeding, apply ½ - ½ cup of our blended organic fertilizer per 5 row feet.

Insect prevention – because onions have a pungent odor, they repel many pests that may visit your garden. Many gardeners integrate onions throughout their garden for this reason.

Seed specs – min germ standard 75% . Seed life 1 year

Seed depth 1/1”

Soil temp for Germ 55-70

Days to Germination – 6-16

Light requirements – Full sun

Thin plants to 2-5”

 

Rows 9-12

Onion Evergreen Long White bunching (2011)

Sow – in average soil in full sun after danger of frost in spring. In frost-free areas, sow in fall. Sow thinly in rows 12” apart and cover with 1’4” of fine soil. Firm lightly and keep evenly moist. Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days. Thin to stand 3” apart when seedlings are 1-2” high

60-120 days

 

 

Covering Raised Beds

Jeff Northam - Monday, February 15, 2016

Even though it's the middle of February it is so nice outside that I had just had to start on some gardening. Even though Walla Walla is in zone 5 the high today was over 60 and the next 10 days are projected to be high 50's and low 60's and no freezing temperatures.  Since it's an El Nino year we are suppose to have higher than average temperatures...got me wondering if I could start growing things outside. Or at least prepping things to grow outside! So the project for today was covering one of my raised beds.

 

Over the years I have removed almost all the water thirsty grass in my year and replaced them with raised beds. The largest of the raised beds is home to several dozen strawberry plants. Typically we can pull handful of berries off starting in May but I'm hoping the covered bed will work like a greenhouse. Hopefully the thick plastic will trap in heat and moisture forcing the plants to start producing fruit earlier than normal. Since the strawberry plants are of the ever bearing variety and hopefully the strawberry season will be extended! Yum!

 

Honestly this was a simple project. A few years ago I had mounted 3/4" pvc (irrigation pvc) to the outside of the raised beds using plumbing strap. It probably would of been cleaner to mount the pvc on the inside of the beds but it seemed simpler to screw them to the outside. I then bent sections of 1/2" pvc into the 3/4" sections to form a hoop. I only used 4 hoops. Hopefully it will be enough to hold up the plastic.

 

Speaking of plastic. I used a 10' wide section of 6mm polyethethylene from Home Depot. On one side of the raised bed I used 1/2" staples to secure the plastic near the base of the bed. I used a good number of staples but I may go back and screw in wood slats over the plastic to secure it more firmly to the bed. On the opposite side I stapled the plastic to some sections of 2x4 and then screwed a section of thin wood over the plastic to help keep it in place. This should also allow me to roll up the plastic.

When cutting the plastic to size leave a good 3-4 feet on each side so you can cover the ends.


Here is a link to more pictures of the project